Are you stuck in a rut? – changing your life – Entry 3 class notes – 6th January 2016

Objectives

  1. To find out more about your new teacher i.e. me…

  2. Test your knowledge of New Year’s celebrations at: Join the quiz at kahoot.it

  3. Learn 6 Phrasal verbs & idioms

  4. What is your New Year’s resolution?

  5. Read & listen to people talk about changes in their lives

  6. To be able to write 3 sentences using ‘used to’.

  7. To do a ‘dictogloss’ collaborative writing with a partner.

Ask me three questions.

If you want to progress to Level 1 you need to start using a dictionary NOT translating every word! Try this app/website: dictionary.cambridge.org

prepositions of place: at, on, in, under, over, next to, besides, in front of, opposite, behind

prepositions of time: at, on, in, for, during, since

look up – find a word in a dictionary

 

Today’s words:

idiom noun

UK   US   /ˈɪd.i.əm/

B2 [C] a ​group of words in a ​fixedorder that have a ​particularmeaning that is different from the ​meanings of each word on ​its own:To “have ​bitten off more than you can ​chew” is an idiom that ​means you have ​tried to do something which is too ​difficult for you. [C or U] formal the ​style of ​expression in writing, ​speech, or ​music that is ​typical of a ​particularperiod, ​person, or ​group:Both ​operas are very much in the ​modern idiom.

over the moon

In a state of great happiness.

She is very happy.

a typewriter:

a doll:

leisure noun [U]

UK   /ˈleʒ.ər/  US  /ˈliː.ʒɚ/

B1 the ​time when you are not ​working or doing other ​duties:leisure ​activitiesMost ​people only have a ​limitedamountof leisure time.The ​townlacks leisure facilities such as a ​swimmingpool or ​squashcourts.

bully noun [C]

UK   US   /ˈbʊl.i/

C1 someone who ​hurts or ​frightenssomeone who is ​smaller or less ​powerful, often ​forcing them to do something that they do not ​want to do:You’re just a big bully!Teachers usually ​know who the bullies are in a ​class.

cyberbully noun [C]

UK   /ˈsaɪ.bəˌbʊl.i/  US   /-bɚ-/

someone who uses the internet to ​harm or ​frighten another ​person, ​especially by ​sending them ​unpleasantmessages

“phrasal verb” noun [C]

UK   /ˌfreɪ.zəl ˈvɜːb/  US   /-ˈvɝːb/

B1 a phrase that consists of a ​verb with a ​preposition or ​adverb or both, the ​meaning of which is different from the ​meaning of ​itsseparateparts:“Pay for”, “​work out”, and “make up for” are all ​phrasalverbs.

A1 [I or T] to give ​money to someone for something you ​want to ​buy or for ​servicesprovided:How much did you pay for the ​tickets?I pay my ​taxes.

pay verb (WORK)

B1 [I or T] to give ​money to someone for ​work that they have done:The ​company pays ​itsinterns $4,000 a ​month.We pay €200 a ​day for this ​kind of ​work.Accountancy may be ​boring but at least it pays well.Most of these women are very poorlypaid and ​work in ​terribleconditions.

 rise verb (MOVE UP)

B1 [I] to ​moveupwards:The ​balloon rose ​gently (up) into the ​air.At 6 a.m. we ​watched the ​sun rise (= ​appear and ​moveupwards in the ​sky).

rise noun (INCREASE)

B2 [C] an ​increase:a ​suddentemperature risea 5 ​percent rise ininflation

pay rise noun [C]

UK   US   UK (US pay raise)

C1 an ​increase in the ​amount of ​moneyyou ​earn for doing ​yourjob
preposition noun [C]

B1 in ​grammar, a word that is used before a ​noun, a ​noun phrase, or apronoun, ​connecting it to another word:In the ​sentences “We ​jumped in the ​lake“, and “She ​droveslowly down the ​track“, “in” and “down” are prepositions.

opportunity noun

UK   /ˌɒp.əˈtjuː.nə.ti/  US  /ˌɑː.pɚˈtuː.nə.t̬i/

B1 [C or U] an ​occasion or ​situation that makes it ​possible to do something that you ​want to do or have to do, or the ​possibility of doing something:Everyone will have an opportunity to ​comment.I was never given the opportunity of going to ​college.

career noun [C]

UK   /kəˈrɪər/  US  /-ˈrɪr/

B1 the ​job or ​series of ​jobs that you do during ​yourworkinglife, ​especially if you ​continue to get ​betterjobs and ​earn more ​money:He’s ​hoping for a career in the ​policeforce/as a ​policeofficer.

rhetorical question noun [C]

UK   US  

a ​question, ​asked in ​order to make a ​statement, that does not ​expect an ​answer:“Why do these things always ​happen to me?” is a ​rhetoricalquestion.

idiom noun

UK   US   /ˈɪd.i.əm/

B2 [C] a ​group of words in a ​fixedorderthat have a ​particularmeaning that is different from the ​meanings of each word on ​its own:To “have ​bitten off more than you can ​chew” is an idiom that ​means you have ​tried to do something which is too ​difficult for you.

give up sth

phrasal verb with give UK   US   /ɡɪv/ verb (gave, given)

to ​stopowning and using something:They were ​forced to give up ​theirhomebecause they couldn’t ​pay the ​mortgage.
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