I was getting used to the sun shining every day, but I guess I will have to get used to the rain again – Level 2

Online quizzes:

http://www.examenglish.com/grammar/used_to_would.htm

http://www.grammar-quizzes.com/usedto.html

https://www.englishclub.com/grammar/verbs-m_used_quiz.htm

https://www.usingenglish.com/quizzes/115.html

http://www.esl-lounge.com/student/grammar/4g68-used-to-be-used-to.php

https://www.usingenglish.com/quizzes/326.html

Class objectives:

  1. Use vague language

  2. Speculate about your classmates

  3. Used to and Would for past habits

  4. Get used to/getting used to

  5. Read about a relationship and suggest a solution to their problem

Can you speculate about why a man is planting a tree in the street at night time?

https://www.indy100.com/article/oxford-street-tree-london-mytreelondon-arrabella-neil-cornelius-7371621?utm_source=indy&utm_medium=top5&utm_campaign=i100

 

Half term break:

Half Term: Monday 24 October 2016 – Friday 28 October 2016

Classes Commence: Monday 31 October 2016

http://www.salfordcc.ac.uk/about/term-dates/

Be used to & get used to

Today’s words:

sibling noun [ C ]

C2 a brother or sister:

I have four siblings: three brothers and a sister.
There was great sibling rivalry (= competition) between Peter and his brother.

 

astrology noun [ U ]

the study of the movements and positions of the sun, moon,planets, and stars in the belief that they affect the character andlives of people

Latvian dancing:
 Book genres:
genres2 27002-genredescriptionpage
science fiction:
a prison cell:

active adjective (BUSY)

B1 busy with a particular activity:

You have to try to keep active as you grow older.

biography noun [ C or U ]

 

B1 the life story of a person written by someone else:

He wrote a biography of Winston Churchill.

Compare

mysterious adjective

B2 strange, not known, or notunderstood:

She’s an actress whose inner life hasremained mysterious, despite the many interviews she has given.
He died in mysteriouscircumstances, and there is still apossibility that it was murder.

apathetic adjective

showing no interest or energyand unwilling to take action,especially over somethingimportant:

Young people today are so apatheticabout politics.

conscientious adjective

C1 putting a lot of effort intoyour work:

a conscientious student

obsessed adjective

B2 unable to stop thinkingabout something; toointerested in or worried about something:

Why are people so obsessed withmoney?

speculate verb [ I ] (GUESS)

 

C2 to guess possible answersto a question when you do not have enough information to becertain:

I don’t know why she did it – I’m just speculating.
A spokesperson declined to speculateon the cause of the train crash.
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Bad behaviour in primary schools – group discussion

Made with Padlet

Pupils’ real classroom behaviour caught on camera

The antics of a bright but occasionally disruptive nine-year-old during a reading lesson have been caught on camera.

Each year at least three weeks of teaching time is lost to low-level disruption of lessons by pupils in UK primary schools.

Parents of Year 4 children at a Leicester primary school were able to see how their children behave when cameras were placed in their classroom.

Maisy’s parents, teacher and head teacher reviewed the footage of her making two other pupils laugh during their lesson.

Talk in a group of 3 about examples of bad and good behaviour.

Bullying     /     Attacks on teachers       /     Graffiti      /     Smoking       /     Drinks and drungs

Stabbings       /     Gun crime      /    Vandalism

Image result for words to show active listening

Related image

Image result for words to show active listening

Image result for words to show active listening

Related image

Related image

Level 2 – present tense verb revision

Present tenses:

Which of these situations go best with present simple & which go best with present continuous?

PERMANENT TEMPORARY HABIT JUST NOW
SELDOM OCCASIONALLY THESE DAYS, BUT NOT FOR LONG CLASS TIMES
SOMETHING YOU DO ONCE A YEAR NEVER AT THE MOMENT THE WEATHER TODAY
  1. ‘How do you prefer to study?’ ‘I _________ about the topic and ______ notes.
  2. ‘What languages ______________?’ ‘Chinese, Slovak and Spanish.’
  3. ‘Who _____________ that violin?’ (violin = musical instrument) ‘My wife.’
  4. ‘Your daughter’s very keen on keep fit, isn’t she?’ ‘Yes, _______ yoga and __________  spinning classes at the leisure centre.’ (spinning class = an exercise class)
  5. ‘Where is she now?’ ‘She _____________ weights in her bedroom.’ (weights = dumbbells – exercise equipment)
  6. ‘Who is  ______________ the saxophone in the flat upstairs? Do they ___________ every night? How do you _________?’ (saxophone = a musical instrument)
  7. ‘What’s that song ___________ upstairs?’ ‘I can’t hear it. Oh, yes, she _______________ to One Direction again. She ____________________ them every day. I really ____________ them!’
  8. ‘I know you like _____________ Arabic, but can we __________ in English in class, please?’
  9.  ‘Do you usually wear that hat?’ ‘No, it’s new, normally I _____________ a baseball cap like Ahmed’s. He usually ______________ that red MAGA red one, but today he _______________ a blue NIKE one.
  10. ‘What a lovely watch!’ ‘It ________________________ I’m afraid – it’s been broken for years.’
  11. ‘Could I use your phone?’ ‘I’m afraid it _________________________ at the moment.’

 

Repeated actions not around the moment of speaking: present simple.

Repeated actions around the moment of speaking: present continuous.

We use the present simple for events – things that happen one after another.

We use present continuous for background – things that are already happening when the story starts, or that continue through part of the story.

  • Write a 3 sentence story using both tenses & read it to your partner.

  • Instructions & directions – what tense do we use to write and give instructions?

  • We use present continuous for changing and developing situations

  • Write 3 sentences to illustrate this use of the present continuous.

The world’s population You Your English Prices
Pandas The company Nokia Teenagers The political situation in the UK
cities Us books athletes
Elderly people The USA traffic Autumn

3rd person singular.

  1. What is the most common way of making the 3rd person singular?
  2. What happens with words ending in vowel + y?
  3. What happens with words ending in consonant + y?
  4. After which consonants and groups of consonants do we add -es?
  5. Which two other common words add – es?

Write the third person singular of these verbs?

Box Brush Buy Complete
Cry Defend Deny Destroy
Excite Expect Fry Guess
Look Pray Reach Receive
Rush Spend Want watch

Verbs we don’t use with present continuous

Try to make sentences using these words in the present tense:

Believe Belong Contain Forget
Hate Like Love Matter
Need Own Prefer Realise
Remember Suppose Understand Want
 ‘see’, ‘hear’, ‘taste’, ‘smell’, ‘feel’ are verbs that describe senses. These verbsaren’t usually used in continuous forms. They are often used with ‘can’.
What is a stative verb in English grammar?
An example of a continuous tense is the present continuous or past continuous. These verbs are called stative, or state verbs. A verb which isn’t stative is called a dynamic verb, and is usually an action. Often stative verbs are about liking or disliking something, or about a mental state, not about an action.

Level 2 – Could you tell me when it might be a good idea to use indirect questions?

Objectives

  1. Indirect questions introduction
  2. Jigsaw reading exercise & writing summaries
  3. Student presentation number 1!!!!!
  4. Guess the emotion

Indirect vs Direct questions

Here is a Prezi presentation on the subject

http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/flatmates/episode46/languagepoint.shtml



http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/flatmates/episode46/languagepoint.shtml

http://www.espressoenglish.net/direct-and-indirect-questions-in-english/ 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/flatmates/episode46/languagepoint.shtml

http://www.espressoenglish.net/direct-and-indirect-questions-in-english/ Indirect questions quizzes

  1. http://www.usingenglish.com/quizzes/312.html
  2. http://www.eltbase.com/vtr_refs.php?id=61
  3. http://esl.about.com/library/quiz/bl_indirect.htm
  4. http://www.english-test.net/esl/learn/english/grammar/ii251/esl-test.php
  5. general grammar revision: New English File Advanced Online – grammar games & tests
  6. Memory test + text builder
  7. general grammar revision: Headway Upper-Intermediate Online

Indirect questions role-play

work in a group of 3.

Five very expensive paintings by Picasso, Michelangelo, Rembrant and Warhol have been stolen. Two detectives are going to interview the director of the art gallery about the incident.

One of the detectives is a ‘good cop’ and does not want to upset the famous director, the other detective is the ‘bad cop’ and doesn’t care. The bad cop leads the interview and asks direct questions. The good cop will then re-phrase every question as an indirect question.

At the end – the 2 cops decide if they think the director is guilty or not.

What is she like?
When we ask ‘What is she like?’, we are asking about her personality/character. ‘She is tall’ is not a good answer to this question because ‘tall’ is used to describe appearance.7 Jul 2008

Level 2 – getting to know you questions – present perfect & past simple review

Use past tense verbs to make and answer questions about your life experience.

Level 2 Group 2 wrote and asked each other questions about their lives.

  • Can you spot any grammatical errors in these questions?
  • Do the questions make sense?
  • Can you give a sensible answer to these questions?
  • How do they sound when you say them aloud?
  • Could these questions be asked more simply?
  • Could they be made more interesting with the addition of a secondary question?
  • If you think there is a problem with one of these questions, can you write it differently?
  1. Can you tell me about where you grew up?
  2. What is the most important life lesson you have learnt?
  3. What was the last interesting news you heard recently?
  4. Can you tell me something interesting news you heard recently?
  5. What is the most interesting lesson and best teacher at school?
  6. Have you learned English before you came to the UK?
  7. How fast did you get progress in learning English?
  8. How often do you hear news. From radio or T.V.?
  9. How often do you read newspaper?
  10. What the most fritining thing you have ever felt?
  11. Could you tell me how long you’ve had your phone or computer?
  12. When did you do your school reports and grades?
  13. Have you ever done your school reports and grades?
  14. Could you tell me a place you have never been to but would love to visit?
  15. Did you remember the last big party or celebration you went to?
  16. How long have you been studying English, and whether you’re satisfied with your progress?
  17. What was the best meal you’ve ever to had or restaurant you’ve eaten in?
  18. Who’s you have just met?
  19. What did you remember about your first day at school?
  20. How long had you had a car when you were in your country?
  21. Have you ever tried an activity? But would like to?
  22. Which kind of activity you have not been tried?
  23. Which place have you never been visited?
  24. Did you have any plans for the next 12 months?
  25. How long have you been lived in your present home?
  26. What do you remember from your first or last English lesson?
  27. How long you have known your best friend?
  28. What is the most interesting lesson you’ve studied at school?
  29. Can you tell me what you remember about learning to swim?
  30. Have you already made plans for the next 12 months?
  31. Can you please tell me what have you done last Christmas?
  32. What place have you been going a lot recently?
  33. For how long your country has been independent or existed?
  34. What was your favourite childhood toy and TV programme?
  35. Have you eaten the best meal you have ever had?
  36. Have you met your best friend on carnival?

 

Past tense questions – online exercises:

Advanced Grammar | Past Tense Exercise | esl-lounge Student

How to learn any language in six months – Level 2

How to learn any language in six months | Chris Lonsdale | TEDxLingnanUniversity

after the video we will be having a discussion

read a transcript of the talk here

as you watch – write down 10 words/short phrases from this video

  • these can be words or phrases you don’t understand
  • or things that: you found interesting; disagreed with; surprised you; made you think; thought were idiotic!
  • or things that you’d like talk more about with your group

Continue reading “How to learn any language in six months – Level 2”

Level 2 – discussion – are people reading less nowadays?

Today’s objectives

  1. Icebreakers

  2. College induction

  3. The Proust Questionnaire

  4. Writing diagnostic

  5. Group discussion & Padlet

Look up these words in a dictionary. Discuss the meaning with your colleagues & use these words to write sentences:

trait (noun)
extravagance (noun)
an overrated virtue
despise (verb)
quality (noun)
phrases
talent (noun)
most treasured possession
the lowest depth
to value (verb)
to identify with (verb)
regret (noun)
motto (noun)

Interesting facts about Level 2 Group 2:

Saadaya is a DIY expert.

Abdelmonem is very worried about global warming.

Haifaa doesn’t like pop music.

Simon’s least favourite type of holiday is going to a festival in London.

The most interesting place that Genet has been to is Switzerland.

Hassan and Yohannes’ most exciting film is The Big Stan.

Why is coming to college like having a job?

You have to give your time in a job and you get money; when you spend your time at college you get knowledge.

You need to attend and you need to be on time.

In both instances you can meet new people and get new experiences.

You can expand your horizons.

expand one’s horizons

Fig. to experience and learn new things. Read more! Travel! Go out and expand your horizons!
See also: expandhorizon

What sort of class do you want?

Think about homework; online exercises, apps, using mobiles in class and using dictionaries and translation apps.

Group 1 like homework: tests and writing. Group 3 disagree because if you do it at home you might cheat and copy online. “If you don’t do it, you’re cheating yourself.”

Martin likes to use phone translation because he can find things quickly.

How do you study best? What are your top study tips?

For example: how do you make a note of new vocabulary and grammar. How do you remember things? Where do you work best? When do you work best?

Today’s words:

Trait: honesty is one of Genet’s best traits.

[ U ] behaviour in which you spend more money than you need to:

think she was shocked by my extravagance.

[ C ] something expensive that you buy even though you do not need it:

Perfume is my greatest extravagance.
 a virtue –  a good characteristic or behaviour
overrated – overvalued.
Titanic is very overrated. Getting up early is an overrated virtue.
Despise – Some Man Utd fans despise Liverpool fans.
Quality – The quality of that product is not good.
Eden Hazard has a lot of talent.
My most treasured possession is the medal my grandfather gave me 30 years ago.
The lowest depth of the Ethiopian lake 1500 metres down.
The Estate Agent valued my home at £240,000.

identify sb/sth with sth

— phrasal verb with identify 

to believe that someone or something is closely connected orinvolved with something:

regret – I regret not buying Bitcoin 8 years because now I would be a millionaire.

motto noun [ C ]

 plural mottos or mottoes

Her motto is “Work hard, play hard”.

Made with Padlet

Ranting & raving – pros and cons of getting married – Level 1 & Level 2

Class objectives

  1. Ranting and raving for one minute without stopping.
  2. Ranting about marriage for 3 minutes
  3. Marriage vocabulary & idioms knowledge check
  4. Cost Benefit Analysis of marriage issues
  5. Reading & ordering a Pros & Cons essay
  6. Using linking words to connect contrasting ideas in essays: despite & whereas
  7. Writing a Pros & Cons essay (homework)

Marriage statistics & differences around the world

World Marriage Data 

Do married women live longer than single women?
Indeed, statistically speaking, men get a much better deal out of marriage than their wives—married men tend to live many years longer than single men, whereas married women live only a little bit longer than single women.
Do men live longer if they are married?
Men who have marital partners also live longer than men without spouses; men who marry after age 25 get more protection than those who tie the knot at a younger age, and the longer a man stays married, the greater his survival advantage over his unmarried peers.

Marriage discussion questions

Do a cost benefits analysis of:

  1. Age difference
  2. Getting married multiple times
  3. Age of marriage
  4. Arranged marriage
  5. Blind date
  6. Love at first sight
  7. having 4 wives or husbands (polygamy)/monogamy (single partner)
  8. Marriage vows
  9. Welfare & financial benefits of marriage
  10. Being common-law partners

Dating & Marriage vocabulary

Using contrasting linking words quizzes & explanations:

Whereas

We use the conjunction whereas to indicate a contrast between two facts or ideas:

He loves foreign holidays, whereas his wife prefers to stay at home.

Whereas most new PCs have several USB slots, older ones often only had one.

Warning:

Whereas means the same as while in sentences expressing contrasts. It does not mean the same as while when while refers to time:

The south has a hot, dry climate, whereas/while the north has a milder, wetter climate.

The secretary took care of my appointments while I was away from the office.

Not: … whereas I was away from the office.

In spite of and despite

In spite of and despite are prepositional expressions.

In spite of and despite have a similar meaning to although or even though. They express a contrast between two things. They are both more common in writing than in speaking. Despite is a little more formal than in spite of.

We usually use in spite of and despite with a noun:

He got the job in spite of his prison record.

[recession is a time when the economy of a country is not good]

John’s company is doing extremely well despite the recession.

We can also use in spite of and despite with –ing:

He was very fast in spite of being terribly overweight.

They arrived late despite leaving in plenty of time.

Warning:

We don’t use a that-clause after in spite of or despite. We use in spite of the fact that or despite the fact that:

When they arrived at Malaga it was hot, in spite of the fact that it was only the end of April.

Not: … in spite of that it was only the end of April

In spite of is written as three separate words. We never use of with despite:

They enjoyed the rides in spite of the long queues. (or … despite the long queues.)

Not: … inspite the long queues or … despite of the long queues.

 

Today’s words:

rant verb [ I ]

He’s always ranting (on) about the government.
I get fed up with my mother ranting and raving (about my clothes) all the time.
tying the knot – idiom
Image result for marriage ball and chain idiom
Ball and chain – old fashioned & sexist idiom:
Image result for marriage ball and chain idiom
cost benefit analysis – used especially in business
Image result for cost benefit analysis

pro noun [ C ] (ADVANTAGE)

B2 an advantage to or a reason for doing something:

One of the big pros of living in Madrid is the nightlife.

con noun (DISADVANTAGE)

[ C usually plural ] informala disadvantage or areason for not doing something:

One of the cons of buying a bigger car is that it costs more to run.
You have to weigh up all the pros and cons of the matter before you make a decision.
 

Level 1 & 2 – Last minute Reading exam revision crib sheet

Here are a bunch of question types that have turned up on the C&G Reading exam paper. The sort of questions you can expect to see in the exam.

  1. What is the meaning of the word flubalub… ? Use. See – using context clues – https://macmillanmh.com/ccssreading/treasures/grade6/ccslh_g6_lv_8_3b.html

In the context of the text what does flubalub… mean in the text? – use the dictionary BUT DON’T JUST READ THE 1ST MEANING – words mean different things. The examining board are trying to test you (obviously!)

  1. What is the purpose of the document? See – http://moveon-stage.excellencegateway.org.uk/ilr_php/hottopics/te/l1/indexfs.html?url=http://moveon-stage.excellencegateway.org.uk/ilr_php/hottopics/te/l1/intro/body01.htm
  2. What is the key theme/focus of the last paragraph? The key point of the paragraph is … ‘The writer highlights the impact of … : See – http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/guides/z398d2p/revision
  3. Which textual features are used in this text? See – http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/english/reading/questionsrev2.shtml
  4. What is an appropriate heading for the 3rd paragraph? What is an appropriate title for the text? See – http://www.ieltsbuddy.com/paragraph-headings.html

In order to do this type of task well you must understand the gist, or main ideas, of each paragraph. These tips will help you do this task well.

  • First read all of the headings.
  • Then read the paragraphs carefully and match the ones you are sure about.
  • If you are not sure about one, leave it and move on to the next one. You may be able to match up ones you are not sure about by elimination at the end.
  • Be careful with extra options, e.g. six headings to match with four paragraphs. There will be two headings you don’t need.
  1. The final paragraph has been written in 1st, 2nd, 3rd singular/plural? See – http://study.com/academy/lesson/point-of-view-first-second-third-person.html#lesson
  2. The register/tone of the text is? / The language in the text is (Formal, polite, facetious, technical) See – https://writerswrite.co.za/155-words-to-describe-an-authors-tone/
  3. What is the perspective of the author? See – https://www.thatquiz.org/tq/practicetest?4y393q0w5n5i & http://www.mpsaz.org/rmre/grades/grade5/homework_help/files/authors_purpose_and_perspective2.pdf
  4. What layout features have been used? See – http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/dida/using_ict/presenting_informationrev3.shtml
  5. What discourse markers are used in this text? See – http://dictionary.cambridge.org/grammar/british-grammar/discourse-markers/discourse-markers-so-right-okay
  6. Why is there a paragraph break between 3 and 4? See – http://www.saidsimple.com/content/100835/
  7. What is the target audience for the text? See – http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/english/writing/genreaudiencerev4.shtml
  8. Text type – see – http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/guides/z97mxnb/revision
  9. The content of the text is: biased, factual, fictional, first hand, detached. See – Objective information does not vary, whereas subjective information can vary greatly from person to person or day to day. Subjectivity can actually be wrong, or far from the truth, whereas objectivity means being as close to the truth as possible.12 Jun 2014

Objective vs Subjective Writing: Understanding the Difference

https://blog.udemy.com/objective-vs-subjective/

Search for: What does it mean to be objective

  1. Inverted commas/speechmarks, commas, apostrophes. See – http://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/ks2/english/spelling_grammar/punctuation/read/1/ & http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/guides/zqsyvcw/revision/4
  2. Colons & semi-colons   http://www.colonsemicolon.com/
  3. What does you/it/he refer to? See – https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/english-grammar/pronouns
Purpose of text questions:

describe

advertise

explain

persuade

enterain

inform

instruct

advertise

entertain

warn

sell

show

give instructions/advice

offer help/advice

to show how/why

 

Type of text questions:

Letter (formal/informal)

Leaflet (information or advertisement)

Pamphlet

Set of instructions

Email (formal/informal)

Poster

Advertisement

Text message

Article (any published text)

Timetable

Invitation

Webpage

Sign (danger/road/shop/school etc… can be an image too!)

Certificate

Form

Guide (travel, tourist, grammar…)

Reference book (dictionary, atlas, thesaurus)

Questions about images:

Logo

Sign (can also be a type of text)

Diagram

Photograph

Graph

Illustration

Drawing

 

Language questions:

Scientific

Descriptive

Instructive

Persuasive

Informative

Informal

Formal

Humorous

Aggressive

Features of text:

Bullet points                 Block capitals

Images (see above)     Internet links/web icon

Text box                        Bold text

Columns                       Italics

Headings                     Subheadings

Numbers                     Captions

Compare & Contrast – Things we find difficult – part 3

The difference between the verbs ‘to compare’ and ‘to contrast’ seems to have caused some heated debate. Probably more than it should. I’m not sure why. Perhaps it’s the perenial potato debate. Which do you prefer? Sweet potatoes or old fashioned regular potatoes? Or how about yams? Surely a discussion about potatoes couldn’t cause so much argument, could it?

Let’s look at the meaning of ‘to contrast’ first because it’s easier to understand:

contrast verb

C2 [ T ]to compare two people or things in order to show thedifferences between them:

If you contrast some of her early writing with her later work, you can see just how much she improved.

 

C2 [ I ]If one thing contrasts with another, it is very different from it:

The styles of the two film makers contrast quite dramatically.
The tartness of the lemons contrasts with the sweetness of the honey.
So the potatoes are rounder, and obviously, the sweet potatoes are ummm sweeter. I’m not doing very well here….
Cleveland Health Clinic explain that, “Sweet potatoes provide 400% of your daily requirement of vitamin A. They also have more vitamin C, fewer calories, more fibre and fewer total carbs than white potatoes, despite more sugar. But don’t forget white potatoes — they’re more versatile in cooking and less expensive.
So that’s the contrast sorted. Fine. We’re happy with that. One is usually white the other is usually orange. Contrast! Easy… So, to compare:

compare verb [ T ] (EXAMINE DIFFERENCES)

B1 to examine or look for the difference between two or more things:

If you compare house prices in the two areas, it’s quite amazing how different they are.
That seems expensive – have you compared prices in other shops?
Compare some recent work with your older stuff and you’ll see how much you’ve improved.
This road is quite busy compared to/with ours
But – we also use ‘to compare’ – to talk about similarities and to decide which thing is better. We can make chips out of potatoes and sweet potatoes; the taste is different but overall I prefer regular potatoes:

compare verb [ T ] (CONSIDER SIMILARITIES)

to judge, suggest, or consider that something is similar or of equal quality to something else:

The poet compares his lover’s tongue to a razor blade.
Still only 25, she has been compared to the greatest dancer of all time.
People compared her to Elizabeth Taylor.
You can’t compare the two cities – they’re totally different.

does not compare

 

If something or someone does not compare with something or someone else, the second thing is very much better than the first:

Instant coffee just doesn’t compare with freshly ground coffee.

compare favourably

 

If something compares favourably with something else, it is better than it:

The hotel certainly compared favourably with the one we stayed in last year.