Adjective order & collaborative writing – Level 2 – September 2016

BBC Trending story: “Why the green great dragon can’t exist.

Objectives

  1. Create sentences using correct adjective order

  2. Test your knowledge with a Kahoot! quiz

  3. Collaborative writing exercise – ‘Life in Level 2’

  4. TED Talk & discussion

  5. Level 2 Grammar test

  6. Individual Learning Plan

About Adjective order:

English Grammar | LearnEnglish | British Council | order of adjectives

Adjectives: order – English Grammar Today – Cambridge Dictionary

Quizzes:

  1. https://www.englishclub.com/grammar/adjectives-order-quiz.htm
  2. http://www.esolcourses.com/content/exercises/grammar/adjectives/adjectiveorder/multiple-choice-quiz.html

easier – https://www.usingenglish.com/quizzes/139.html

Student’s sentences:

  1. An extraordinary, tiny, oval, modern, turquoise, Italian, Georgio Armani, crocodile skin handbag.

  2. A beautiful, large, rectangular, brand-new, gold, Chinese, Lenovo, aluminium smartphone.

  3. An amazing, small, flat, new, cerise, Japanese, Toyota copper car.

Today’s words:

household name
noun
 a person or thing that is well known by the public.
  1. “he’d never become a household name, unlike his famous younger brother”

“Van Gogh should be a household name,” said Muluken.

Image result for van gogh paintings

How baby names have changed over the past decade and why: https://familyshare.com/24457/parenting/how-baby-names-have-changed-over-the-last-decade

How people traditionally got their surnames in Great Britain (and other countries):

http://www.localhistories.org/surnames.html

for example – Margaret Thatcher’s family were most likely previously employed as thatchers – making dried grass roofs for cottages:

Image result for thatched roof

reputation noun [ C usually singular, U ]

B2 the opinion that people in generalhave about someone or something, or how much respect or admiration someone or something receives, based on pastbehaviour or character:

The company has a worldwide reputation forquality.
She has the reputation of being a good doctor.
His reputation was destroyed when he was caughtstealing some money.
The hotel has a bad/good reputation.

maiden name noun [ C ]

A woman’s maiden name is the familyname she has before she gets married.

dwelling noun [ C ]

a house or place to live in:

There is an estimated shortfall of some five million dwellings across the country.
Social animals are those animals which interact highly with other animals, usually of their own species (conspecifics), to the point of having a recognizable and distinct society.
 
striped:
checked:
spotted or polka dots:
a pink colour – cerise:
the colour and a precious stone – turquoise:

infer verb [ T ]

 

C2 to form an opinion orguess that something is truebecause of the information that you have:

What do you infer from her refusal?
[ + that ] I inferred from her expressionthat she wanted to leave.

the gist noun [ S ]

the most important pieces ofinformation about something, or general information withoutdetails:

That was the gist of what he said.
I think I got (= understood) the gist ofwhat she was saying.

frumpy adjective

(of a person or their clothes)old-fashioned and notattractive:

I felt fat and frumpy.
a frumpy cardigan

lump verb

lump it – “like it or lump it”

to accept a situation ordecision although you do not like it:

The decision has been made, so if Tom doesn’t like it, he can lump it.

cut and dried adjective

already decided and unlikely to be changed:

We need a cut-and-dried decision by the end of the week.

simple and easy to understand:

Most fire investigations are pretty cut and dried, but this one has left morequestions than answers.

outlandish adjective

strange and unusual anddifficult to accept or like:

an outlandish hairstyle/outfit
Image result for outlandish clothes

cut and dried adjective

already decided and unlikely to be changed:

We need a cut-and-dried decision by the end of the week.

simple and easy to understand:

Most fire investigations are pretty cut and dried, but this one has left morequestions than answers.

the top of the tree

  (British & Australian)

if someone is at the top of the tree, they are at the highest position in their job or in an organization Who would have guessed that she would get to the top of the tree before her clever and talented brother?
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