MarkESOL 5 minute grammar lesson – Using Will & Won’t for the future

ESOL Lockdown Learning – will & won’t

Here are some more practice exercises for your English language lockdown learning.

Below the exercises is the Google Doc transcript from the 5-minute grammar lesson. Extra teacher talk from the video not included!

Future Simple

The simple future has two forms:  will and be going to

Generally we use will for promises and instant decisions.

We use be going to for future plans or when we are 100% certain.

Negatives and Questions

To make the negatives, use won’t (will not) or isn’t/aren’t going to

To make the questions, move one word forward from the statement to make a question: He is going to bed. -> Is he going to bed? You will marry me. -> Will you marry me?

EXTRA VIDEO LESSONS:


Today’s video Google Doc transcript

MarkESOL 5 minute grammar lesson. 

Using WILL and WON’T for the future.

Today we’re going to be covering:

  1.   What’s the difference between ‘will’ and ‘going to’ for the future?
  2. When do we use WILL and WON’T?
  3. Making offers
  4. A promise
  5. Making predictions
  6. How to make statements
  7. How to make negative statements
  8. Making questions
  1. What’s the difference between ‘will’ and ‘going to’ for the future?

The first thing to say is – DON’T WORRY. BRITISH PEOPLE DON’T CARE ABOUT THE DIFFERENCE! They really don’t. Examiners care. English teachers care, and if you want to have perfect fluent English – you should care too!

Do you remember when we use going to for the future? 

That’s right! We use GOING TO + infinitive verb = for decisions you have made before and things you are certain about:

“I’m going to phone my friend in a minute because she is going to visit me tomorrow.”

So we don’t say:

“She will visit me tomorrow.” Going to – for plans.

People will understand this statement, but it shows that you don’t understand the rules.

3. When do we use WILL and WON’T?

  1. For sudden decisions. Like in a restaurant when the waiter asks you want you would like, “Hmmm, I think I will have the chicken.” You decide instantly. In a click of your fingers. Hmmm, chicken or fish, hmmm? Yes! I will have chicken. Although, we almost always use the short version. I’LL – not the full version I WILL.
  2. “Do you want a glass of wine?”

“No, I won’t, I’m going to drive home.” It’s the same with negative statements – we always say I WON’T – hardly ever I WILL NOT.

  • Making offers – “I’ll give you a lift home in my car.”
  • A promise – “I’ll do my homework next week.” Hmmm? Really? “I’ll give you the money next week.” Do you believe that? Get evidence!
  • Making predictions – when you are guessing or thinking, “I think she will be late! She won’t wake up in time! We’ll miss the bus!” “Ahmed will pass the exam.” “Mark will give us homework again! I’m sure!” 

Statements with – WILL

subjectwillInfinitive verb Extra informationwhen
IwilldoMy homeworksoon
she/he/itwillvisither friendlater
wewillstudyin collegeIn June
youwilltryTo exercise in the parkThis afternoon
theywillgoon a dietIn the summer

We also say, I think – because we’re not sure. I think we will have a great time tonight. 

Negative statements with – WON’T

subjectwon’tInfinitive verb Extra informationwhen
Iwon’tdrinkany alcoholtonight!
she/he/itwon’ttalkher friendever again!
wewon’tbe meetingOn Wednesday
youwon’texerciseUnless I do it with you!
theywon’teatvegetables

We also say, I don’t think + will for negative:

I don’t think he will give us any money!

I don’t think I will go to the party tonight.

Questions with – WILL

Question wordwillsubjectInfinitive verb Extra informationwhen
WhenwillItakeMy exam?
Willshe/hevisitustomorrow?
Willitrainlater?
HowwillweStudy Englishthis term?
WherewillyouexerciseThis afternoon?
WhatwilltheydoIn the summer?
  • Another way of saying the negative is “I don’t think he’ll remember my birthday.” This is the same as WON’T. 
  • Shall! You can also use SHALL:

“I shall help you.”

“Shall we go for a walk?”

But that is another 5 minutes!

Bye bye!

MarkESOL xxx

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