Illegible & insipid ‘Dictionary race’ Level 2 Group 2 – 30th March 2016

Objectives

  1. Dictionary race – practice using dictionaries quickly

  2. Regrets & conditionals

  3. Giving advice

  4. Discoursive essay about homelessness

Today’s words:

illegible adjective

  (of writing or ​print) ​impossible or ​almostimpossible to ​readbecause of being very ​untidy or not ​clear:His writing is ​almost illegible.

insipid adjective

  not having a ​strongtaste or ​character, or having no ​interestor ​energy:a ​pale insipid ​wineHe’s an insipid ​oldbore.Why anyone ​buysmusic with such insipid ​lyrics is a ​mystery.

peckish adjective

  slightlyhungry:By ten o’clock I was ​feeling peckish, ​even though I’d had a ​largebreakfast.

stingy adjective

  unwilling to ​spendmoney:He’s really stingy and never ​buys anyone a ​drink when we go out.The ​landlords are so stingy – they ​refused to ​pay for new ​carpets.

Scrooge:

hovel noun [C]

  a ​smallhome that is ​dirty and in ​badcondition

chance noun

 chance noun (OPPORTUNITY)

B1 [C] an ​occasion that ​allows something to be done:I didn’t get/have a chance to ​speak to her.[+ to infinitive] If you give me a chance tospeak, I’ll ​explain.Society has to giveprisoners a second chance when they come out of ​jail.He ​left and I missed my chance to say ​goodbye to him.I’d go now given ​half a chance (= if I had the ​slightestopportunity).

Synonym

opportunity

exacerbate verb [T]

  to make something that is already ​badevenworse:This ​attack will exacerbate the already ​tenserelations between the two ​communities.

partially adverb

 C1 not ​completely:The ​meat was only partially ​cooked.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

acquiesce verb [I]

  to ​accept or ​agree to something, often ​unwillingly:Reluctantly, he acquiesced to/in the ​plans.

debris noun [U]

  broken or ​tornpieces of something ​larger:Debris from the ​aircraft was ​scattered over a ​largearea.

able adjective

 able adjective (CAN DO)

be able to do sth

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • I’ve never been able to do ​crosswords.

  • Dr Jones is very ​busy but I’m ​sure she’ll be able to ​see you ​tomorrow.

    bold adjective (BRAVE)

B2 not ​frightened of ​danger:She was a bold and ​fearlessclimber.The ​newspaper made the bold move/took the bold step of ​publishing the ​names of the men ​involved.

  • bold adjective (NOTICEABLE)

B1 strong in ​colour or ​shape, and very ​noticeable to the ​eye:They ​painted the ​kitchen in bold colours.in bold (type/print) printed in ​thickdarkletters:This ​sentence is ​printed in bold.

weary adjective

C2 very ​tired, ​especially after ​working hard for a ​longtime:I ​think he’s a little weary after his ​longjourney.Here, ​sit down and ​restyour weary ​legs.weary ofC2 bored with something because you have ​experienced too much of it:I’ve been going out with the same ​people to the same ​places for ​years and I’ve just grown weary of it.

miser noun [C]

  someone who has a ​strongwish to have ​money and ​hates to ​spend it

hovel noun [C]

  a ​smallhome that is ​dirty and in ​badcondition

stingy adjective

  unwilling to ​spendmoney:He’s really stingy and never ​buys anyone a ​drink when we go out.The ​landlords are so stingy – they ​refused to ​pay for new ​carpets.

peckish adjective

  slightlyhungry:By ten o’clock I was ​feeling peckish, ​even though I’d had a ​largebreakfast.

insipid adjective

not having a ​strongtaste or ​character, or having no ​interestor ​energy:a ​pale insipid ​wineHe’s an insipid ​oldbore.

illegible adjective

(of writing or ​print) ​impossible or ​almostimpossible to ​readbecause of being very ​untidy or not ​clear:His writing is ​almost illegible.

idiom:

take someone for a ride 2. Fig. to deceive someone. You really took those people for a ride. They really believed you. I was taken fora ride on this matter.

a hammock:

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