Level 2 Group 2 – class notes – 18th November 2015

1 Are you a slave to your mobile?

2 Broadsheet & tabloid newspapers – comparison of Prince Harry story

4 Presentation

3 Compare the styles of broadsheets & tabloids.

4. Exam practice

Words of the day:

spam noun [U] (COMPUTING)

C1 informal disapproving unwantedemail, usually ​advertisements:I get so much spam at ​work.

concise adjective

UK   US   /kənˈsaɪs/

short and ​clear, ​expressing what ​needs to be said without ​unnecessary words:Make ​youranswersclear and concise.
concisely

adverb UK   US   /-li/

sensational adjective

UK   US   /senˈseɪ.ʃən.əl/

C2 approving very good, ​exciting, or ​unusual:a sensational ​sportscar/​dressShe ​looks sensational (= ​extremelyattractive) in her new ​dress.C1 disapproving Sensational ​newsreports and ​articles are ​intended to be ​shocking and ​excitingrather than ​serious:Some of the more sensational ​newspapers have given a lot of ​coverage to the ​scandal.

objective adjective

UK   US   /əbˈdʒek.tɪv/

B2 based on ​realfacts and not ​influenced by ​personalbeliefs or ​feelings:an objective and ​impartialreportI can’t really be objective when I’m ​judging my daughter’s ​work.

Opposite: subjective adjective

UK   US   /səbˈdʒek.tɪv/

C1 influenced by or ​based on ​personalbeliefs or ​feelings, ​ratherthan ​based on ​facts:I ​think my ​husband is the most ​handsome man in the ​world, but I ​realize my ​judgment is ​rather subjective.More ​specific and less subjective ​criteria should be used in ​selectingpeople for ​promotion within the ​company.

circumstance noun

UK   /ˈsɜː.kəm.stɑːns/  US   /ˈsɝː.kəm.stæns/

B2 [C usually plural] a ​fact or ​event that makes a ​situation the way it is:I ​think she ​coped very well under the circumstances.Obviously we can’t ​deal with the ​problem until we ​know all the circumstances.She ​died in ​suspicious circumstances.

spam noun [U] (COMPUTING)

C1 informal disapproving unwantedemail, usually ​advertisements:I get so much spam at ​work.

back sth up

phrasal verb with back UK   US   /bæk/ verb

C2 to ​prove something is ​true:His ​claims are ​backed up by ​recentresearch.B2 to make an ​extracopy of ​computerinformation:Make ​sure you back up ​yourfiles.

back (sth) up

phrasal verb with back UK   US   /bæk/ verb

to ​drivebackwards
guinea pigs
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